Music festival – Rockcoast Festival http://rockcoastfestival.com/ Thu, 12 May 2022 12:44:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rockcoastfestival.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-11-120x120.png Music festival – Rockcoast Festival http://rockcoastfestival.com/ 32 32 Blues on the Broadbeach Music Festival https://rockcoastfestival.com/blues-on-the-broadbeach-music-festival/ Wed, 11 May 2022 05:06:43 +0000 https://rockcoastfestival.com/blues-on-the-broadbeach-music-festival/ The annual institution that brings slide guitar to the surf. You suppose visitors to Broadbeach rarely think of the blues. The Gold Coast suburb is more often busy luring surfers, shoppers and holidaymakers to its beach-side wonderland. But Broadbeach will get an extra boost this month thanks to an influx of avid blues fans. The […]]]>

The annual institution that brings slide guitar to the surf.

You suppose visitors to Broadbeach rarely think of the blues.

The Gold Coast suburb is more often busy luring surfers, shoppers and holidaymakers to its beach-side wonderland. But Broadbeach will get an extra boost this month thanks to an influx of avid blues fans.

The Blues on Broadbeach Music Festival is an annual event that welcomes international and Australian talent to a series of outdoor stages, parks and venues throughout the suburb. You can expect to hear a range of blues-inspired music, as you stroll through a neighborhood full of restaurants, cafes and bars. Taking place over four days this year, the festival will be presented by critically acclaimed jazz trumpeter James Morrison and his performance Motown Experience. He appears alongside American names in Robben Ford – who has collaborated with Miles Davis, George Harrison and Joni Mitchell – and Mississippi bluesman RL Boyce, who will appear with Dom Turner, best known as the founder of the Backsliders.

Eight-piece Japanese funk orchestra Osaka Monaurail will bring the party, while Emma Donovan and The Putbacks, Mia Dyson, Karise Eden, Jimi Hocking, Jason Delphin, 8 Ball Aitken and more will lead a local showcase. This year will also see the introduction of an all-new park scene in Federation Park, which will host a program of gritty, offbeat acts.

See the full program and more details.

This article is produced by Broadsheet in partnership with Tourism and Events Queensland.

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The Lincoln Park Music Festival kicks off the season with Mike Phillips on Thursday https://rockcoastfestival.com/the-lincoln-park-music-festival-kicks-off-the-season-with-mike-phillips-on-thursday/ Tue, 10 May 2022 13:35:08 +0000 https://rockcoastfestival.com/the-lincoln-park-music-festival-kicks-off-the-season-with-mike-phillips-on-thursday/ NEWS | FEATURES | PREVIEWS | EVENTS originally published: 05/10/2022 (NEWARK, NJ) — Lincoln Park Coast Cultural District (LPCCD) presents the official 15th anniversary of its long and busy Lincoln Park Music Festivalwhich will return to its outer Lincoln Park home on several occasions in July and August 2022. The Lincoln Park Music Festival has […]]]>
NEWS | FEATURES | PREVIEWS | EVENTS



originally published: 05/10/2022

(NEWARK, NJ) — Lincoln Park Coast Cultural District (LPCCD) presents the official 15th anniversary of its long and busy Lincoln Park Music Festivalwhich will return to its outer Lincoln Park home on several occasions in July and August 2022. The Lincoln Park Music Festival has evolved over the past 15 years into a season full of music, arts, culture and good -be from April to October every year.

Kicking off the year of the festival’s crystal anniversary is world famous saxophonist Mike Phillips to the acclaimed Jazzy Soul Series, taking place Thursday, May 12 at 6:00 p.m. at the revitalized Medallion Restaurant at the Robert Treat Hotel, 50 Park Place, downtown Newark. Celebrating the release of his upcoming album, Newark will be the exclusive New Jersey tour stop on Mike Phillips’ Summer 2022 Tour. Click here to register for the event.

Mike is the first musician signed by Michael Jordan to the Nike Jordan brand, home of the Air Jordan, and is the only musician in the world to have recorded and toured with the legendary “Big Three” of American soul and pop music: Michael Jackson . , Prince and Stevie Wonder, not only as a member of the band, but as a featured soloist. This Thursday, Mike Phillips will perform his new song “City Lights” and some tracks from hit albums Uncommon denominator (2005); MP3. (2010); Remove the covers (2020); and his first success You reached Mike Phillips (2002), which celebrates its 20th anniversary this year. Opening the show will be incredible Newark musician/singer/composer JANÉ and spoken word poet/artist The Euphony.

“Our flagship arts and culture initiative – the Lincoln Park Music Festival – has weathered many storms, from the economic recession of 2008-09 to the national tragedy of 9/11 and now a global pandemic,” says Anthony Smith , executive director. “Through it all, our annual Lincoln Park Music Festival has been a constant healing space for attendees and performers through dance, expression, food and cultural exchange. For small businesses, our festival is an economic engine for their local brick-and-mortar establishments; a launching pad for new ventures; and place of sale of handicrafts. After two abbreviated years, the return of a full season and an outdoor festival to the park demonstrates Newark’s resilience and a semblance of normality. It will be a spirit filled experience for all who attend.

The annual Lincoln Park Music Festival (LPMF) is the largest musical experience rooted in the traditions of the African-American and Afro-Caribbean diaspora in the Tri-State area. LPMF has expanded to an audience of 50,000 to 60,000 international attendees who come together, over two weekends, to experience multiple genres of music including Gospel, Jazz, House, Hip-Hop, Rhythm & Blues, Reggae, Dancehall, Soca, Kompa and the Latin/Hispanic Diaspora, as well as teaching film, technology and music.

The Lincoln Park Coast Cultural District, Inc. (LPCCD) is a non-profit organization actively engaged in the practice of economic development through Creative Placemaking. Its mission is to plan, design and develop a comprehensive arts and cultural district in the Lincoln Park neighborhood of downtown Newark. LPCCD’s major arts and culture programs include the annual Lincoln Park Music Festival, the City of Lincoln Park Music Speaks humanities initiative, the Lincoln Park Jazzy Soul music series, the Lincoln Park Sustainable Living Community Podcast, Lincoln Park and the Lincoln Park Gallery Without Walls public art initiative.

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FREE EVENT! St. Mary’s College of Maryland Jazzed Up for the Mulberry Music Festival Friday, June 17 – Southern Maryland News Net https://rockcoastfestival.com/free-event-st-marys-college-of-maryland-jazzed-up-for-the-mulberry-music-festival-friday-june-17-southern-maryland-news-net/ Mon, 09 May 2022 17:51:19 +0000 https://rockcoastfestival.com/free-event-st-marys-college-of-maryland-jazzed-up-for-the-mulberry-music-festival-friday-june-17-southern-maryland-news-net/ The Kelly Bell Group St. Mary’s College of Maryland presents Mulberry Music Festival: Jazz, featuring Joseph Brotherton, the Kelly Bell Band, Carly Harvey, and headlined by Sharón Clark on Friday, June 17, beginning at 6 p.m. on Townhouse Green of the College. The event is free and open to the public. It will be simulcast […]]]>

The Kelly Bell Group

St. Mary’s College of Maryland presents Mulberry Music Festival: Jazz, featuring Joseph Brotherton, the Kelly Bell Band, Carly Harvey, and headlined by Sharón Clark on Friday, June 17, beginning at 6 p.m. on Townhouse Green of the College.

The event is free and open to the public. It will be simulcast live on the College’s website at www.smcm.edu/mulberry. In addition to performing, Harvey, a former student of St. Mary’s College, will reprise her role as master of ceremonies.

The Mulberry Music Festival is the vision of President Tuajuanda C. Jordan and is held annually on the eve of June 19. Originally created in 2019, this festival featured a gospel theme and chart-topping recording artist Jason Nelson.

“I strongly believe in bringing people together through the universal language of music. This year’s Mulberry Music Festival, focused on jazz – a true American art form created by African Americans and characterized by harmony, syncopated rhythms and improvisation – is sure to do just that,” said said Tuajuanda C. Jordan, president of St. Mary’s College.

Attendees are encouraged to bring lawn chairs, blankets and food to help enjoy the event. Food vendors will be on site. The Townhouse Green opens at 4 p.m. on the day of the event.

About the performers

Joseph Brotherton is well known for his musical sense and trumpet style. Born in Nashville, Tennessee, Brotherton started playing the trumpet when he was 8 years old. After serving as a trumpeter in the Marine Corps Band Quantico, he settled in Washington, DC and is now thriving on the music scene in the East Coast region and abroad. . Brotherton studied with Wynton Marsalis, Ingrid Jensen and Ron Blake among others. He has performed live with Gregory Porter, Aaron Neville, James Earl Jones, Greg Karukas, Benito Gonzales, Robert “Mousey” Thompson, Stephen Riley, Neal Caine, Kermit Ruffins and Eric Lewis, to name a few.

According to Jazz Improv Magazine, “Joseph Brotherton is an exciting and spectacular soloist, well-educated in post-bop tradition and concepts. His solos are notable for their clarity, connectedness of ideas, clear articulation, intonation, and tasteful and measured use of his ample technique.

Based in Washington, DC, Carly Harvey combines blues, jazz, soul and American roots styles to create a unique sound reminiscent of Etta James, Bonnie Raitt and Nina Simone, with a bit of Ella Fitzgerald thrown in for good measure. In July 2018, she was featured in Big City Blues Magazine as one of the youngest blues artists to watch. She has had the privilege of sharing the stage with iconic musicians including Annika Chambers, Ron Holloway, Kebbie Williams, Ephraim Owens, Cory Henry, Kofi Burbridge, Junior Marvin and Susan Tedeschi – an artist whose work has been the basis of his musical development. Currently dubbed DC’s Queen of Blues, Harvey is the winner of the 2021 Wammie Award for Top Blues Artist.

Originally formed as the back-up band for rock and roll pioneer Bo Diddley, the Kelly Bell Band has since traveled the world, entertaining fans in Japan, Spain, Italy, Greece, Cuba, Germany and Moreover. The group has won two prestigious Maryland Music Awards, was voted “Best Blues Band” in the Mid-Atlantic region for 12 consecutive years, and was recently named “Best Band” by Baltimore Style magazine. The band’s debut album, “Phat Blues Music” remains one of the best-selling albums in the history of the Mid-Atlantic region. The group is led by Kelly Bell, known as “The Bluesman”, who is joined by Ryan Fowler and Eric Robinson (guitar), Taylor Zimmerman (vocals/violin) Frankie Hernandez (bass), John Robert Buell (drums) and Jon Mauer (keyboard).

Washington, DC star Sharón Clark has had audiences uplifted at festivals and concerts around the world. The Jazz Times wrote of Clark: “A revelation. . . I never thought I would hear a singer with the range, musicality and mastery of tone and timbre that was Sarah [Vaughan] at its best, but now I’ve done it.

Clark has toured countless internationally, from Europe to Southeast Asia, the Middle East and Russia, where she has developed a significant following. She has performed as a featured soloist with the Duke Ellington Orchestra, Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra, Richmond Symphony and Baltimore Symphony.

She has appeared at festivals at home and abroad. The Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra and the Ludacris Foundation chose Clark to perform for their separate tributes to Quincy Jones.

Clark won the gold medal and $10,000 first prize in the American Traditions Competition at the Savannah Music Festival. She went on to win first place in the Billie Holiday Vocal Competition, taking home a $2,500 prize as well as a featured appearance with the Baltimore Symphony.

St. Mary’s College of Maryland, the National Public Honors College, was designated an Honorary College of the State of Maryland in 1992. It is ranked among the top public liberal arts schools in the nation by US News & World Report. About 1,600 students attend the college, nestled on the St. Mary’s River in southern Maryland.

The Kelly Bell Group

Sharon Clark

Carly Harvey

Joseph Brotherton








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‘Freaks of Nature’ music festival in Riyadh sparks huge response https://rockcoastfestival.com/freaks-of-nature-music-festival-in-riyadh-sparks-huge-response/ Sat, 07 May 2022 21:16:41 +0000 https://rockcoastfestival.com/freaks-of-nature-music-festival-in-riyadh-sparks-huge-response/ DUBAI: The national cuisines of a few countries can boast the variety of influences found in Saudi dishes, thanks to the remarkable assortment of flavors and ingredients introduced to the Kingdom over the centuries by pilgrims, merchants and travellers. The variety of traditional dishes that can be found across the country reflects these diverse cultural […]]]>

DUBAI: The national cuisines of a few countries can boast the variety of influences found in Saudi dishes, thanks to the remarkable assortment of flavors and ingredients introduced to the Kingdom over the centuries by pilgrims, merchants and travellers.

The variety of traditional dishes that can be found across the country reflects these diverse cultural influences – from India, North and East Africa, South and Central Asia and the Levant – who have enriched and seasoned the traditions of the Kingdom.

Today, Saudi chefs and the hospitality industry are once again using food to help build bridges between nations and cultures. One organization embracing this art of ‘culinary diplomacy’ is The Red Sea Development Company, which runs the new tourism megaproject taking shape along the Kingdom’s Red Sea coast.

TRSDC CEO John Pagano with a group of Saudi hospitality students. (Provided)

In line with the goals of Saudi Vision 2030, the national strategy for economic diversification, TRSDC works to stimulate new industries, create jobs, encourage entrepreneurship and stimulate growth in the tourism, leisure and of the hotel industry.

“At the moment, our focus is to bring young Saudis into the hospitality industry,” Lars Eltvik, the company’s senior education advisor, told Arab News.

“This is a new industry for the Kingdom and there was previously a very limited supply of hospitality and culinary education in the country. This is no different from what was happening in Dubai 20 years ago.

The Red Sea Project is a plan for a sustainable tourist resort covering approximately 28,000 square kilometers along the western coast of Saudi Arabia, including more than 90 unspoiled islands. The 50 hotels and 1,300 residential properties to be built there will be served by some of the best restaurants in the Kingdom, according to Eltvik.

“We want to be able to attract, document and develop food from all regions of Saudi Arabia so that it can then be showcased in luxury hotels across the Red Sea Project,” said- he declared.

TRSDC partners with institutions across the Kingdom that were founded to preserve and promote Saudi cuisine. (Provided/TRSDC)

Eltvik has been in the hospitality and hospitality education industry for three decades. Between 2001 and 2009 he was based in Dubai, where he worked at the Emirates Academy of Hospitality Management.

He hopes that the success the sector has enjoyed in the commercial capital of the United Arab Emirates can be replicated in Saudi Arabia on a shorter time scale and in a way that is more faithful to the country’s cultural sensibilities.

“In Saudi Arabia, everything is in the fast lane now,” Eltvik said. “We are working to achieve the same (as we did in Dubai), and more, but in a very short time. At TRSDC, we seek to onboard tens of thousands of employees, with a strong focus on hospitality and, in the hospitality industry, a focus on the culinary arts.

Saudi chefs and the hospitality sector are again using food to help build bridges between nations and cultures. (Supplied/ZADK)

The company is working to promote the hospitality industry as a desirable career option for young Saudis, he said, in line with the government’s Saudiization campaign. To this end, education authorities in the Kingdom have implemented a number of programs in which TRSDC will sponsor interns who will eventually fulfill critical roles in the sector, he added.

“We are focused on the authenticity of enhancing tourism and hospitality through food in the Kingdom, and by projecting and educating young Saudis to proudly present their history and past through experience culinary,” Eltvik said.

There is consensus that simply replicating the type of restaurants and cuisines found in cities around the world will not help transform Saudi Arabia into the distinctive culinary destination envisioned. Emphasizing the promotion of the culinary arts and typical Saudi flavors is therefore clearly a priority.

QUICKREALITIES

• The Red Sea Project is a 28,000 km² sustainable tourism resort that is expected to be completed by 2030.

• The Red Sea Development Company is expected to contribute $5.3 billion to the national gross domestic product

While many traditional local dishes are common across the country – such as kabsa, which is made with rice, meat, vegetables and spices, and hares, an Arab favorite made from ground wheat, meat and spices – flavors, ingredients and cooking techniques can vary greatly from region to region.

The Red Sea port city of Jeddah has long drawn travelers from both the region and the world, resulting in dishes filled with Persian, Levantine, Turkish, Maghrebi, and Central and South Asian influences.

In Hijaz, for example, the influences of popular dishes such as rice bukhari, manto (dumplings stuffed with beef and onion), shish barak (dumplings of meat cooked in a yogurt-based stew) and rice kabli can be traced back to central and eastern Asia, while the origins of vegetable-based stews that are popular in the region can be found in North Africa and the Levant.

Meanwhile, on the central Najd plateau, the local cuisine includes heavier dishes such as soups, stews and sauces that are better suited to the region’s cooler climate.

“I created ZADK because I saw that in Saudi Arabia we lacked an academy to learn our cultural cuisine,” said Rania Moualla. (Supplied/ZADK)

In March, the TRSDC appointed Lawrence Assadourian its Culinary Director with a mandate to work with Saudi chefs to create unique food options for regional and international visitors, while promoting local favorites.

“One of our missions is community development,” he told Arab News. “How are we, as a group, going to make the Red Sea feel like they belong? (That) it’s not just a replica of an experience of another destination in the world?

“And one of the ways we are looking to do that is to create the necessary programs that will incubate and accelerate Saudi-based chefs. by local populations, in addition to foreign talent.

Sustainability is at the heart of what TRSDC hopes to achieve as the Kingdom’s nascent tourism, leisure and hospitality industries strive to create offerings that are sensitive to local customs and compliant with the environment.

“We are a regenerative tourist destination,” Assadourian said. “We care deeply about the environment and the integration of the communities in which we build our projects.

“We need to make sure we strike a solid balance between the international cuisine experienced in our destination and how we infuse Saudi Arabia’s culinary and cultural heritage into the entire guest experience journey.”

While many traditional local dishes are common across the country, flavors, ingredients, and cooking techniques can vary widely from region to region. (Supplied/ZADK)

To achieve this, TRSDC partners with institutions across the Kingdom that were founded to preserve and promote Saudi cuisine.

Among those who welcome TRSDC’s mission to serve the culinary traditions of the Kingdom to the world is Moe Inani, executive chef and co-owner of Chifty, an elegant restaurant and cosmopolitan lounge in Riyadh.

Although he is an engineer by training, Inani said his first love was cooking, a skill he learned early on helping his mother prepare meals at the family home in Jeddah, his hometown.

After completing his studies in the United States, Inani became a sous chef at Saison, a Michelin-starred restaurant in San Francisco where he learned how to prepare sushi, then at the high-end restaurants Nobu and Morimoto.

With his background in Japanese cuisine, Inani has created new twists on more conventional local catches of Red Sea fish, and Arab News has learned that talks are underway for him to collaborate with TRSDC.

“We want to be able to attract, document and develop food from all regions of Saudi Arabia,” said Lars Eltvik, senior education advisor at Red Sea Development Company. (Provided)

“Food has always united us,” Rania Moualla, a Saudi philanthropist and founder and president of ZADK, a nonprofit culinary academy in Al-Khobar in the Eastern Province, told Arab News.

The academy was founded in 2018, three years after Moualla published her cookbook, ‘A Spoonful of Home’. Its mission to nurture Saudi Arabia’s rich culinary heritage by empowering local chefs is similar to that of TRSDC, with which it has formed a partnership.

“I created ZADK because I saw that in Saudi Arabia we lacked an academy to experience our cultural cuisine,” Moualla said. “Most of our restaurants are in the hands of expatriates. I started ZADK because I wanted to do something sustainable and with a bigger impact for the community. »

She said the academy is looking for ways to grow its partnership with TRSDC in helping train the next generation of Saudi leaders.

“I can’t wait for their students to study at our academy,” Moualla said.

The Red Sea Project is a 28,000 km2 sustainable tourist resort that is expected to be completed by 2030. (Supplied/TRSDC)

In doing so, ZADK, which also has a separate partnership agreement with Culinary Arts Academy Switzerland, aims to promote the Saudi food scene and ensure it meets international standards.

“Our mission is to develop the best culinary school in Saudi Arabia, make it a platform for social change and teach our cuisine in a way that enables students to learn about international cuisines as well as Saudi cuisines” , Moualla said.

“Our goal is to allow our students to travel the world with Saudi cuisine and heritage.”

It is precisely this type of culinary diplomacy that TRSDC aims to offer visitors to Saudi Arabia to savor and enjoy by 2030, when the Red Sea Project is due to be completed.

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Groundwater Country Music Festival unveils first 2022 lineup https://rockcoastfestival.com/groundwater-country-music-festival-unveils-first-2022-lineup/ Fri, 06 May 2022 07:36:37 +0000 https://rockcoastfestival.com/groundwater-country-music-festival-unveils-first-2022-lineup/ Fanny Lumsden, Travis Collins, Brooke McClymont & Adam Eckersley, Catherine Britt, Gina Jeffrey and Kirsty Lee Akers will perform at the Groundwater Country Music Festival on the Gold Coast in October. Festival Director Mark Duckworth said, “This year’s Groundwater CMF is shaping up to be one of our best country music nights yet! “In 2022, […]]]>

Fanny Lumsden, Travis Collins, Brooke McClymont & Adam Eckersley, Catherine Britt, Gina Jeffrey and Kirsty Lee Akers will perform at the Groundwater Country Music Festival on the Gold Coast in October.

Festival Director Mark Duckworth said, “This year’s Groundwater CMF is shaping up to be one of our best country music nights yet!

“In 2022, our festival fans will be treated to incredible acts from across the country as well as international flavors along the way.

“Three days of country music will swell the spirit and welcome the Queensland sun in October, over 40 country artists will take to the various stages of Groundwater CMF to entertain and connect with fans across Australia.”

Groundwater Country Music Festival October 28-30, 2022.

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Groundwater Country Music Festival’s first exciting lineup unveiled – myGC.com.au https://rockcoastfestival.com/groundwater-country-music-festivals-first-exciting-lineup-unveiled-mygc-com-au/ Wed, 04 May 2022 22:35:43 +0000 https://rockcoastfestival.com/groundwater-country-music-festivals-first-exciting-lineup-unveiled-mygc-com-au/ Golden Guitar Award winners Fanny Lumsden and Travis Collins will be among the headliners at this year’s Groundwater Country Music Festival. The first lineup for this year’s event has been unveiled as organizers prepare for the biggest crowds in years now that borders are fully open and COVID restrictions have been lifted. The three-day festival […]]]>

Golden Guitar Award winners Fanny Lumsden and Travis Collins will be among the headliners at this year’s Groundwater Country Music Festival.

The first lineup for this year’s event has been unveiled as organizers prepare for the biggest crowds in years now that borders are fully open and COVID restrictions have been lifted.

The three-day festival will take place around Broadbeach from October 28-30.


THE ARTICLE CONTINUES AFTER THIS ANNOUNCEMENT


Lumsden comes off the back of a huge 12 month old who saw his album Fallow reached number one in the ARIA country rankings and in the top ten of the overall ARIA rankings.

“It’s so exciting to return to Groundwater CMF this year! It was the first festival we got to play on the ‘big stage’ in 2017, so it’s definitely one of our favorite festivals…to play and just to be there as well,” Lumsden said.

Fanny Lumsden will be among the headliners for this year’s Groundwater CMF

Joining Lumsden and Collins will be fellow Australian country stars Brooke McClymont and Adam Eckersley, Gina Jeffreys, Catherine Britt and Kirsty Lee Akers.

Akers, whose new album Wild debuted at number one on the ARIA charts ahead of The Kid Laroi and Lee Kernaghan, says Groundwater is going to be one hell of a party.

“There is finally light at the end of the tunnel – live music is back! I can’t wait to take the stage at the Groundwater Country Music Festival, my favorite festival of the year in beautiful Queensland,” said Akers.

Kirsty Lee Akers will be among the headliners at this year’s Groundwater CMF

With international borders now open, Groundwater will once again be able to welcome country music stars from overseas.

New Zealand’s Kaylee Bell and number one selling Canadian artist Dan Davidson will join the lineup along with other international artists expected to be announced before October.

Groundwater Country Music Festival director Mark Duckworth said this year’s event is set to be one of the best country music nights ever.

“In 2022, our festival fans will be treated to incredible acts from across the country as well as international flavors along the way,” Duckworth said.

“Three days of country music will swell the spirit and welcome the Queensland sun in October, over 40 country artists will take to the various stages of Groundwater CMF to entertain and connect with fans across Australia.”

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Rock Farm | The story behind the Wampus Cat Music Festival – THE RANT https://rockcoastfestival.com/rock-farm-the-story-behind-the-wampus-cat-music-festival-the-rant/ Mon, 02 May 2022 18:13:25 +0000 https://rockcoastfestival.com/rock-farm-the-story-behind-the-wampus-cat-music-festival-the-rant/ Thompson Square will headline the country music scene on Friday night. https://thompsonsquare.com/ A 200-acre empty pasture along the Lee-Harnett County line will be transformed into a concert hall for nearly 100 rock and country bands, including some big names with huge followings. The story of how the Wampus Cat Music Festival came to: By Gordon […]]]>
Thompson Square will headline the country music scene on Friday night. https://thompsonsquare.com/

A 200-acre empty pasture along the Lee-Harnett County line will be transformed into a concert hall for nearly 100 rock and country bands, including some big names with huge followings. The story of how the Wampus Cat Music Festival came to:

By Gordon Anderson and Billy Liggett


AAs of this writing, the Gross Farms II facility is a largely empty 200-acre field off Rosser-Pittman Road, just above the Lee-Harnett county line. The rolling property, formerly a working farm, has a few dirt roads and one hell of a view, but not much else.

By May 13, at least for the weekend, everything will change.

May 2022 digital edition

During these three days, Gross Farms II (owned by the same family that operates the Gross Farms Corn Maze and Pumpkin Patch off NC 87 in southern Lee County) will become a concert hall for up to 15,000 people from across North Carolina and beyond to watch performances by nearly 100 artists ranging from 90s hitmakers like Everclear, Lit and Sister Hazel, to current country superstars like Thompson Square, and artists emerging independents like Nitro Nitra, Hanging Cities, Hope Darling and many more.

In short, it’s a list of deeds from your past, your present, and hopefully your future. There is something for every taste.

This first-year event, known as the Wampus Cat Music Festival (the name comes from a North Carolina folk tale about a mystical creature said to have inhabited the state since colonial times) is a collaboration between Gross Farms and Indie on Air Records.

If Indie on Air sounds familiar, it’s because the organization has already hosted a successful music festival, the Carolina Indie Fest, which was first held in downtown Sanford in September 2021 and attracted more than 6,000 people in the city center over two days.

Jeff Popka, CEO of Indie on Air Records, said the Sanford area is a target for the company’s goal to “help make Sanford and area a musical destination.” In addition to the Carolina Indie Fest, Indie on Air has hosted multi-day music festivals in Texas, Colorado, Pennsylvania, and elsewhere.

“People will travel from all over for a music festival experience,” Popka said. “The economic benefits for the business community can be substantial.”

But while Carolina Indie Fest was a free event centered in downtown Sanford, live music fans should expect Wampus Cat to be a little different in several important ways. First of all, the entrance is paying. Second, because it takes place on the Gross Farms II property at 3345 Rosser Pittman Road in West Harnett County, attendees are encouraged to stay for part of or even the entire weekend, with campsites available for a fee. additional charges.

Nearly 20 food trucks will be on site throughout the weekend, along with an array of breweries, distilleries and even hard cider vendors to keep spectators from drying out.

For Popka and his team, who have been working on Wampus Cat since it was first announced in the fall, the first two weeks of May will be all about “working out all the loose ends.”

“All the big issues have been resolved,” he said. “There are administrative logistics to go through. We hadn’t done the wifi deal before (mid-April), for example, and that was quite stressful.

Tickets and the full lineup are available at wampuscatmusicfestival.com, and Popka said based on early sales, Indie on Air is already expecting strong attendance, with the possibility of a sold-out Friday night sale. .

Tractors and other grading and digging equipment are all you can find at Gross Farms II – a 200-acre farm off Rosser-Pittman Road, just over the Lee County line. Harnett. But in a few weeks, the ground will be transformed into a three-story concert hall intended to accommodate more than 90 bands and thousands of fans over a three-day period. Photo by Billy Liggett

“For the first year, we are capping attendance at 15,000 people,” he said. “We really have room for 30,000 people, but a lot of first-year festivals are overwhelmed with people and we don’t want that to happen. We want to be able to serve everyone and make sure we can make this event a success and then figure out how to make it bigger next year.

Popka said Indie on Air is working closely with area officials like the Harnett County Sheriff’s Office to ensure a safe event for everyone.

“Everyone is of course welcome, but our market will be people in their 30s, 40s and 50s,” he said. “We don’t want to be Woodstock. We went over our contingency plans with Harnett County, and now it’s just about executing what we know how to do.

In late April, Popka said about 1,500 tickets had been sold in advance, many to people from outside the region or even other states. Tickets went on sale in late 2021, and the pace picked up considerably as the event approached.

“We know the last two weeks are when most of the action happens, so it’s a good idea to get tickets as soon as possible,” he said. “Tickets and parking at the gate will cost more, so everyone should buy early.”

And once year one of Wampus Cat is over, Popka and Indie on Air will turn their attention to September and year two of the Carolina Indie Fest in downtown Sanford, which they expect to be bigger and better.

“Sanford is so perfectly suited for events like this,” he said. “We are so excited for the future.”

The sign at the entrance to Gross Farms II on Rosser Pittman Road is up for the upcoming Wampus Cat Music Festival, scheduled for May 13-15. The 200-acre farm will host nearly 100 groups for three days.

WANT TO GO?

  • What: The Wampus Cat Music Festival, sponsored by Indie On Air Records and Gross Farms
  • When: May 13-15 with times to be determined
  • Or: 3345 Rosser Pittman Road, just south of US 421 and the town of Broadway. Entrances will be marked with signs.
  • who: Big names in rock (Everclear, Lit, Sister Hazel), indie and country music (Thompson Square, the Swon Brothers) will join nearly 100 groups on three different stages during the three days of the event.
  • Cost: Three-day passes (including parking) are $128.40. Day passes (parking not included) cost $52.43 and can be purchased on the website.
  • Approvals: There will be camping, food, drum circles, costume contests and more.
  • Why Wampus Cat?: The name of this festival comes from the North Carolina folk tale of the Wampus Cat, a mystical cat-like creature said to have been sighted in the area since colonial times.
  • Learn more: www.wampuscatmusicfestival.com has a full list of bands, updates, and links to buy tickets.

Questions and Answers | JEFF POPKA

The ritual : Let’s pretend people don’t know anything about the Wampus Cat Music Festival. What do you tell them?

Jeff Popka: It’s an outdoor music festival. It will be held on just under 200 acres of festival ground at Gross Farms II, which is technically on Broadway, although Gross Farms itself is in Sanford. But it’s a nice place.

There will be more than three days, there will be camping on site, parking on site, more than 90 groups approximately. [and an indie stage]. We feature national headliners as well as independent artists from across the country. And when we talk about independent actors, we’re not talking about those who play in their garage or in our backyard. We’re talking about emerging indie acts that are bursting on the road and working and doing what it takes to get noticed. And that’s our way of helping them.

And it’s also our way of building the music community in the Sanford area as we’ve been talking about for the past few years.

And finally, it’s a partnership between Gross Farms and Indie On Air Records. And we think it’s going to be a lot of fun.

The ritual : Tell us about some of the biggest names to come.

Jeff Popka: On the country side, we have Thompson Square. Stephanie Quayle. We just announced Maggie Rose. The Swon Brothers. Tyler Reese Tritt. Of course, the Cliff Wheeler Band – although you might consider them regional because they’re from Lemon Springs, but they’ve also toured across the country. On the rock side, we find Everclear, Lit and Sister Hazel. JR Richards, who is the former leader of Dishwalla.

Nitro Nitra and Hope Darling, we are thrilled with them. And then we had other national bands that toured the world like the Steepwater Band.

The ritual : The Carolina Indie fest was held in downtown Sanford last year. Did you see this as a sort of test for something bigger like this? How do you think Indie Fest went?

Jeff Popka: I think it went well for a freshman festival to draw 12,000 people over two days. I thought that was fantastic. And we got great feedback. Not just from our artists, but from the city itself. We are therefore very satisfied. The Wampus Cat is Carolina Indie Fest on steroids. That’s how I see it.

The ritual : Wampus Cat is more ambitious and on a much larger scale. Why are you sure it will work?

Jeff Popka: The booming region you are in is one of the fastest growing regions in the country. And we put our footprint right there. We just think it’s a fantastic fit. You are close to the highway so it is easy for everyone along the east coast to get there. We have lots of groups from places like Philadelphia, Delaware, Baltimore, Washington DC, Virginia and South Carolina – these are all easy drives to Sanford. We think we can tap into this whole region.

We plan to do well in Winston-Salem and Greensboro, which is another market and is only an hour away. A big draw from Raleigh-Durham is also expected. We advertise it everywhere – and we’re not expensive. So we are quite confident that it will work well.

Listen to the full interview with Jeff Popka on rantnc.podbean.com

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Mission Folk Music Festival Announces 2022 Lineup – Mission City Record https://rockcoastfestival.com/mission-folk-music-festival-announces-2022-lineup-mission-city-record/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 20:30:00 +0000 https://rockcoastfestival.com/mission-folk-music-festival-announces-2022-lineup-mission-city-record/ The Mission Folk Music Festival has announced its roster of musical artists who will perform at the 35th annual festival, July 22-24, at Fraser River Heritage Park. The 2022 festival features a diverse roster of talented artists and bands from across Canada, the United States, Estonia, Taiwan and Chile. More than 20 acts are planned […]]]>

The Mission Folk Music Festival has announced its roster of musical artists who will perform at the 35th annual festival, July 22-24, at Fraser River Heritage Park.

The 2022 festival features a diverse roster of talented artists and bands from across Canada, the United States, Estonia, Taiwan and Chile. More than 20 acts are planned on the day stages and on the evening main stage.

Tickets are on sale now with a special 35th anniversary discount – for the next 35 days only.

MFMF Artistic Director Michelle Demers Shaevitz has cooked up a weekend that features both familiar names and exciting new discoveries – spanning a musical world.

“It is a pleasure for us to return in person to Fraser River Heritage Park for our 35th anniversary festival,” said Demers Shaevitz. “I’m thrilled to welcome people to the park to share incredible world music with them. This year’s lineup offers festival-goers everything from singer-songwriter folk to Celtic, blues, bluegrass and the unique nu-folk soul of Puuluup in Estonia, the electrifying sound of Golosa La Orquesta in Chile, and for our final act on the Saturday night main stage, the dynamic Quebec zydeco of the Winston Band – and much more.

From the heart of the BC Rockies, Shred Kelly will help kick off the festival on Friday night, and a Canadian treasure, William Prince, will close the show on Sunday.

The festival kicks off Friday night (July 22) with a lineup of concerts on the main stage. Saturday and Sunday (July 23 and 24) see music workshops, concerts and collaborations on three daytime stages, with a showcase of artists on the main evening stage on both days.

This year, the festival brings its Wee Folks programming to every stage of the day so children and their families can listen to music while they play.

In addition to the Great Melody, there are food and craft vendors, as well as a licensed shaded bistro on-site. Participants can also choose to camp in the park for an additional fee.

More than 300 enthusiastic and dedicated volunteers ensure the smooth running of the festival.

To celebrate the festival’s 35th anniversary, weekend passes are on sale for 35 days for $105 for adults, $90 for seniors (60+) and students, and $50 for youth ( 13-18).

The offer is valid until May 31. On June 1, higher ticket prices come into effect.

Buy your tickets at: http://www.missionfolkmusicfestival.ca/

List of artists:

William Prince (Manitoba)

From his roots in the Peguis First Nations, Prince’s influences range from his childhood gospel to the pantheon of classic outlaw country singers to baseball and the great beyond.

(Sunday evening main stage)

Music The Winston (QC)

A joyous hybrid of Zydeco, French-Canadian roots, rock and Cajun music – get ready to dance!

(Saturday night main stage)

Shred Kelly (BC)

A five-piece alternative folk-rock band from the heart of the Canadian Rockies, Shred is guaranteed to kick your blood circulation up a notch or two!

(Friday night main stage)

Shakura S’Aida (Ont.)

Born in Brooklyn, raised in Switzerland and based in Canada, blues singer S’Aida has been rocking people with her powerful hits for years.

Golosa La Orquesta (Chile)

Milonga, Chachachá, Bolero, Waltz, Tango, Swing, Festejo! An explosive mix of Latin American rhythms and sounds – and more!

Ayanasabee, ON

An Oji-Cree singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist with a soulful voice.

The McDades (AB/QC)

Music of Celtic origin fusing the spontaneity of jazz with infectious global rhythms – a sound like no other.

Clerel (Cameroon/QC)

This born singer, soul singer and songwriter is blessed with an effortlessly elegant aesthetic.

Puuluup (Estonia)

A pinch of surrealist nude folk, a dollop of modern folklore, loopers – and a talharpa revival!

Kanatal (Taiwan)

Four talented indigenous musicians Amis with multi-ethnic origins come together to create music that boldly crosses borders.

Ronnie Dean Harris (BC)

Harris, aka Ostwelve, is a Sto:lo/St’át’imc/Nlaka’pamux multimedia artist, performing Indigenous hip-hop on Coast Salish territory.

Amanda Rheaume (Ont.)

Amanda’s roots and guitar ballads introduce crucial dimensions to the world of American music and Heartland Rock.

Lonesome Town Painters (BC)

A traditional East Van bluegrass quartet.

Graham Lindsey (ON)

With his mandolin, his tenor banjo and his guitar, this artist is passionate about Celtic music and shares this passion with you.

Crow quote (NL)

This Americana duo combines soft harmonies with a sometimes bewitching aesthetic that bewitches and seduces at the same time.

Good Medicine Songs / Éy St’elmexw St’elt’ílém (BC)

Demonstrate the power of song and storytelling to bring Halq’eméylem language and culture to life.

The Sky Crescent (BC)

This indie-folk quartet creates music with rich, soaring harmonies and dynamic instrumentation.

Strongbow and Wry (BC)

Everyone is invited to join friendly veteran fiddlers/musicians, Tony Ivan O’Hara and Jennie Bice (AKA Strongbow and Wry) for a festival jam!

Robert Sarazin Blake (WA)

He’s one of Bellingham’s finest songwriters and performers, and an interesting guy with insightful things to say.

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Crawfish Music Festival is one of the greatest of all time https://rockcoastfestival.com/crawfish-music-festival-is-one-of-the-greatest-of-all-time/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 02:00:00 +0000 https://rockcoastfestival.com/crawfish-music-festival-is-one-of-the-greatest-of-all-time/ BILOXI, Miss. (WLOX) – It was a great last day for a monster race. When the final numbers roll in, the nearly three-decade-old Crawfish Music Festival at the Mississippi Coast Coliseum is one of the biggest ever. On Sundays, the musicians jammed, the rides twisted and the crawfish boiled, better than ever. “I’m a happy […]]]>

BILOXI, Miss. (WLOX) – It was a great last day for a monster race.

When the final numbers roll in, the nearly three-decade-old Crawfish Music Festival at the Mississippi Coast Coliseum is one of the biggest ever.

On Sundays, the musicians jammed, the rides twisted and the crawfish boiled, better than ever.

“I’m a happy man right now,” said Coliseum executive director Matt McDonnell. “Really happy.”

He has good reason to be.

“Three great days of music where a lot of tickets were sold out and then the march was really good,” McDonnell said. “Ancillary income from food and drink was huge. I couldn’t have asked for a better result. It’s one of the best festivals we’ve ever had.

Among the many blessings was good weather.

“I can’t remember spending five days at a crawfish festival without rain,” he said.

McDonnell said he looks forward to the final evaluation.

“Everything indicates that several records are going to be broken,” he said.

Vendors like Kriss Amacker, owner of Sweetie Pies Catering and Bakery, are feeling the love.

“I appreciate the people. I like the music. It’s a great vibe. It’s always a good crowd,” she said. It’s been four years. It’s been a wonderful crowd, incredibly large, but it’s been enjoyable.

It brings people back year after year.

“I was able to come here with my parents as a kid and enjoy all the fun, rides and games,” Dalton Barber said. “And it’s really surreal to be able to do that with her. It’s home. They have great food that we always enjoy. It’s all about southern Mississippi there.

Christina Burks makes this an annual visit primarily for local groups.

“It’s such a fun time to see all these musical acts and really see them before they got really big and famous.”

This year, she shares it for the first time with her 4-year-old son, Hudson.

“Oh, that’s awesome,” Burks said. “It’s a lot of fun. He loves music and seeing everyone on stage, playing drums and guitar instead of watching on TV.

For Burks, it’s more than music.

“It’s a beautiful weekend,” she said. “The crayfish are amazing, of course. Seeing all the families here having fun is a real joy to see.

Another example of the scale of the crawfish music festival is that McDonnell said the entertainment budget was approaching $400,000.

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Tamworth Country Music Festival and other events create ‘no vacancies’ for homeless people https://rockcoastfestival.com/tamworth-country-music-festival-and-other-events-create-no-vacancies-for-homeless-people/ Sat, 23 Apr 2022 22:53:40 +0000 https://rockcoastfestival.com/tamworth-country-music-festival-and-other-events-create-no-vacancies-for-homeless-people/ Charities say people in need of temporary or emergency accommodation are deprived of prizes at major festivals, creating an increase in homelessness. Key points: Homeless charities say the Tamworth Country Music Festival has led to a rise in homelessness Most of them are locals who have been deprived of temporary accommodation in hotels and caravan […]]]>

Charities say people in need of temporary or emergency accommodation are deprived of prizes at major festivals, creating an increase in homelessness.

Tamworth in NSW’s northwest has more than 50 hotels within 10 miles of its CBD, but most have been booked months ahead of this week’s country music festival.

While the festival and the tens of thousands of tourists it attracts are a lifesaver for local businesses, homelessness organizations have warned it is their busiest time of year.

Tamworth Family Support Service (TFSS) manager Lynda Townsend said temporary accommodation was not only hard to come by, but unaffordable.

“We see the price of motels going up, almost double for a room, at about two weeks [from the festival]“said Ms. Townsend.

“It’s not necessarily that they are expelled.

“And we realize that happens at every major event in Australia, but Tamworth is not forgotten.”

Thousands of tourists are in Tamworth this week for the music festival.(ABC New England North West: Kemii Maguire)

Homelessness is on the rise

TFSS clients go through episodes of homelessness lasting weeks or months on average, with the majority related to domestic violence.

The number of service customers has increased in recent years due to the housing crisis in the New South Wales region.

The last street count carried out by TFSS in February found 20 homeless people in the Tamworth district.

The number of couch surfing and domestic violence victims, or people known as the hidden homeless, is said to be much higher.

tents only sign in front of the green lawn
Hundreds of people are camping on the sports grounds in Tamworth town centre.(ABC New England North West: Kemii Maguire)

“During the festival, if you are a woman with children, there are emergency accommodations which fill up quickly,” Ms Townsend said.

Due to the COVID-19 Omicron outbreak, the Tamworth Country Music Festival schedule has changed from its usual January timeslot to an Easter Monday start date.

This meant that instead of being a summer festival where temperatures could soar above 30 degrees Celsius, it took place on a week where low temperatures dropped to as low as 5°C.

Tamworth street with people walking by, banners and stalls
Support Services believe the hidden homeless in Tamworth are increasing in number every year.(ABC New England North West: Kemii Maguire)

Not just tourist events

Digby Hughes of Homelessness NSW said the issue of temporary accommodation at major events had been raised for several years but had not seen any change.

“The government is siloed and fractured,” the acting chief executive said.

“The people who take care of the events are not part of the accommodation for the homeless [and] the government department that is not involved in the events.

Mr Hughes said the problem was not specific to Tamworth or tourist events.

“We see this happening along the coast, the Elvis festival in Parkes, road works and cherry picking season – they all require accommodation,” he said.

Tourism Accommodation Australia has been contacted for comment.

budget motel sign
Homelessness NSW says more financial support should be made available to those in need.(ABC New England North West: Kemii Maguire)

Homelessness NSW and TFSS believe a permanent solution would be to fund more social housing.

“People who are stuck at the bottom of the market need to find affordable housing,” Mr Hughes said.

“In the short term, services need more funding to be able to help people [who are] sleep on the street afford motel rooms during price hikes.”

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